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© 2019 by Recker Financial LLC.

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The information on this site is provided “AS IS” and without warranties of any kind either express or implied. To the fullest extent permissible pursuant to applicable laws, Recker Financial LLC (referred to as "Recker Financial") disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, non-infringement and suitability for a particular purpose. Recker Financial does not warrant that the information will be free from error. None of the information provided on this website is intended as investment, tax, accounting or legal advice,  as an offer or solicitation of an offer to buy or sell, or as an endorsement of any company, security, fund, or other securities or non-securities offering. The information should not be relied upon for purposes of transacting securities or other investments. Your use of the information is at your sole risk. Under no circumstances shall Recker Financial be liable for any direct, indirect, special or consequential damages that result from the use of, or the inability to use, the materials in this site, even if Recker Financial or a Recker Financial authorized representative has been advised of the possibility of such damages. In no event shall Recker Financial LLC have any liability to you for damages, losses and causes of action for accessing this site. Information on this website should not be considered a solicitation to buy, an offer to sell, or a recommendation of any security in any jurisdiction where such offer, solicitation, or recommendation would be unlawful or unauthorized.

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5 Signs You Need A Financial Planner

Asking for help is a sign of strength, not weakness


Sometimes it’s hard to ask for help and you think you can – or should – handle things yourself. Whether it’s taking care of a nagging injury, fixing the sink, changing the oil in your car or doing your own taxes. The same questions often arise about finances and financial planning.

You have questions that you consider silly or stupid and feel that you should handle alone so you don’t seek help. This is not necessarily the best course. As happens often in life generally, not reaching out to a professional can delay you reaching your goals and cause you to incur more out-of-pocket expenses.


With respect to your financial future, there are no stupid questions. Don’t sit on the sidelines and fear asking a question or think you’re unqualified to go to a financial planner. Solid and respectable planners let you know if they can’t help you and refer a professional who can. They also let you know if they think you can plan your finances yourself.

Here are signs you may need a financial planner:


1. You recently married


To merge or not to merge finances is a huge question: emotions to contend with, forms to update, cash flow to track, debts to pay down, goals to lay out and spending habits and needs to reorganize and prioritize.


Communication during this transition helps you navigate possible questions about taxes, investment allocation updates, selecting benefits, joint roles in management of the household, deciding whether to maintain separate bank accounts and more.


2. You own a business


Whether considering starting your own business or a long-term entrepreneur, you likely need to know how to prioritize goals, pay yourself while keeping the operation running and the best way to manage cash flow on an income that fluctuates monthly.


Not to mention saving for retirement, obtaining health insurance and protecting you and your family against a loss in income from death or disability.

3. You want to make a big purchase

Simple budgeting often enables you to handle large purchases. If you are looking to buy a first home or make another sizable investment, understanding the overall effect on your cash flow, lifestyle and future goals looms large.


How much home can you afford? What’s your budget for home maintenance? What other goals go on the back burner? What about your future savings?


4. You make a career change

Job or career transitions also bring changes in income and benefits. Make sure you maximize your company benefits, leave no retirement accounts behind and ignored, plan appropriately for income fluctuations, consider future job growth or career prospects and consider the transition’s overall influence on your lifestyle.


5. Your family is growing

A baby comes with a slew of considerations: ensuring you have an emergency fund of three to six months’ expenses adjusting your spending for child care, groceries and medical costs and updating your estate plan and insurance coverage in case something happens to you, among many other needed updates.


The first step in asking for help always seems the hardest. The assistance and feedback may surprise you when you are open to the idea that you need not handle all financial questions solo. And remember:


“The greatest mistake you can make is to believe that you have to do everything on your own power.” ~Catherine Pulsifer, Author


Copyright © 2019 RSW Publishing. All rights reserved.

Distributed by Financial Media Exchange.


Content Disclosure

Nothing contained herein shall constitute an offer to sell or solicitation of an offer to buy any security. Material in this publication is original or from published sources and is believed to be accurate. However, we do not guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of such information and assume no liability for any resulting damages. Readers are cautioned to consult their own tax and investment professionals with regard to their specific situations.